Hausa Online

Learning Hausa (and other less commonly taught languages) using the Internet

Herrmann Jungraithmayr on Muryar Jamus

Posted by hausaonline on Thursday, March 12, 2009

My former supervisor and Hausa teacher, Prof. Dr.  Herrmann Jungraithmayr, besides being a well known Hausa scholar, has also studied and published books on several other Chadic languages. Muryar Jamus has  a report on him:

Farfesa Hermann Jungraithmayr ɗan ƙasar Jamus ya wallafa littattafan a harshen Tangale

You can listen to it here:

Broadcast about Herrmann Jungraithmayr on Muryar Jamus

2 Responses to “Herrmann Jungraithmayr on Muryar Jamus”

  1. Esther Majidadi said

    Hi, Prof. just to say hello and to ask you about some lexical items that perplex me in tangale. the syllabic ‘m’that tend to negate words that shouldn’t be, in expressions line pidom soori. should it be written pido m soori or pido msoori.again mbeendam ga yi n waro.laliinum waana. and lastly palamum kon to mention just a few.when i seperate m from the word presiding it continously the writing system becomes too overloaded with the syllables m or n.To leave it with the presiding words negates them. I feel like adding it to the next word as in pido msoori. pls may I know your observations.

  2. Herrmann Jungraithmayr said

    Dear Ms. Majidadi,

    thank you for your mail of August 20, 2010.
    The m in pidom soori is different from e.g. n lokom where it negates n loko.
    The m in pidom soori goes back to the full form mo which is a sort of relative pronoun; thus, pido mo soori is literally “the tree which is high”.
    Please, do not write is pido msoori! The same applies to laliinum waana and palamum kon. I think, the negation m carries a high tone, the m(o) a low tone.
    Moreover, neg. m usually stands phrase-finally, the relative m never!
    I am glad to have received your question(s).
    God bless you!

    Yours truly,

    Herrmann Jungraithmayr

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